Posted in Books for Assignment #1

MIRROR, MIRROR

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Singer, M.  (2010). Mirror, Mirror.  NY:  Dutton.

Mirror, Mirror is a book of reverso poems that can be read from top to bottom and bottom to top. This book specifically focuses on fairy tale poems. Each reverso shows two perspectives from main characters of each story. These poems exhibit the multiple viewpoints from which a story can be understood.

Visual Elements of Art:

Line-

Mirror, Mirror is a book of reverso poems that are each separated by an invisible line. This line between each poem shows the contrast and change of perspective for each poem. In most of the poems, the readers sees the perspective of the protagonist versus the antagonist. One example is Goldilocks and the Three Bears. The separation of these poems solicits the question of whether it was the bears’ fault that they did not lock their door.  

Composition-

Mirror, Mirror exhibits all of the characteristics mentioned in previous sections: lines, shapes, color, and texture. There is an invisible line that separates and shows the contrast between the two poems that are displayed on each page. This concept is described in detail above in the line section of this presentation.  Shapes and colors are very important in Mirror, Mirror as the villains are seen with more pointed and angular features and darker clothes while the protagonists are softer and more rounded with light, bright clothing. This concept is seen through the characters of Snow White and the Wicked Queen; Snow White has a kind, round face and is wearing light blue and yellow while the queen has extremely pointed features and is wearing deep red and black. Finally, the visual texture of these poems is enhanced by Josee Masse and his use of both shading and three dimensional images.

Evaluative Criteria:

Style-

Mirror, Mirror is packed with stylistic elements that enhance the writing of each reverso poem. Singer uses imagery, allusions, and so many more literary devices throughout this collection of poems. The “fragrant green air” in the Jack and the Beanstalk poem and the description of the “moist muzzle” and “hairy ear” in the Beauty and the Beast poem are great examples of imagery. The allusion aspect of the poems is the most obvious element because of the fact that all the poems allude back to fairytale stories known by most people. Mirror, Mirror could be picked apart poem by poem to reveal multiple literary and stylistic elements, but the most important is the author’s use of her reverso poem style.  

Lesson Plans

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Posted in Books for Assignment #1

THIS IS NOT MY HAT

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Klassen, J. (2012). This is not my hat. Boston, MA: Candlewick.

The little fish does not think that the big fish will notice that his hat has gone missing during a nap. The little fish then thinks that he can hide and won’t be found. In the end, the big fish finds the little fish and takes back his hat. But will we ever know what happened to the little fish?

Visual Elements of Art:

Shape-

The author and illustrator of This is Not My Hat uses simple shapes to convey an underwater story. Although the two fish are similar in shape (large ovals), the author uses a change in the size of the shapes to show how the smaller fish compares to the larger. He also uses other simplistic shapes such as circles as bubbles and long lines as algae.

Evaluative Criteria:

Setting-

The setting of This is Not My Hat is obviously under the sea, as the reader can notice through the illustrations. Although the setting is minimalistic, there is no question as to where the action takes place. The characters also lend themselves to the setting as they are aquatic creatures (i.e. two fish and a crab) swimming around algae and underwater plants.

Lesson Plan

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

THE THREE PIGS

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Wiesner, D. (2001).   The three pigs.  NY:  Clarion.

The story starts out like the original Three Little Pigs, but then the pigs break out of the old story by outsmarting the wolf. The pigs then travel through different fairy tales, and eventually end up back in the brick house of the third pig. With the help of the other fairy tale characters, they keep the wolf out of the house and live happily ever after.  

Visual Elements of Art:

Texture-

The Three Pigs author and illustrator, David Wiesner, starts with a traditional cartoonish drawing style but then changes to a more realistic and three-dimensional style. The reader can see the difference in the textures which helps the reader to understand whether the pigs are in the fairytale or the new world of the book’s pages. The reader first sees this contrast on page 3 when the first pig is able to get to safety on the pages of the book. These two concepts continue to be intertwined until the final page of the story in which Wiesner returns to the traditional cartoon stylings.

Evaluative Criteria:

Illustrations-

Illustrations within the story The Three Pigs help the reader to understand the difference between the two world; the fairy tale world and the book’s pages’ world. If only words were on the pages, there would be no way for the reader to infer that the first pig had escaped from the wolf and onto the pages of the book. The illustrations become even more valuable as the pigs fold up the storybook’s pages to travel along. By the end, they have found their way to a happily ever after back in the storybook style pages.

Lesson Plans

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

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Sendak, M. (1963).  Where the wild things are. NY: HarperCollins.

Max, dressed in a wolf suit, runs around his house wreaking havoc.  After his mother calls him a wild thing, Max tells her that he will eat her up and is sent to his room without dinner.  As the night goes on, Max’s room changes into a jungle and then the sea. Max sails to where the wild things are, and he is able to tame them and become king of the wild things. The have a wild rumpus but are then tired, and Max send the wild things to dinner without supper. Max then realizes he would rather be where someone loved him. He decides to sail home where a supper is waiting for him.

Visual Elements of Art:

Texture-

Maurice Sendak creates an unusual backdrop to Where The Wild Things Are through the use of visual textures. These illustrations make Max and the Wild Things come to life because of the use of layering. The pages in which Max’s room is changing into a forest are a perfect example of Sendak’s layering that cause the room to come more alive with every page. The images of the wild things are also extremely vivid and extremely specific which help create a very pointed perspective.

Evaluative Criteria:

Illustrations-

Where the Wild Things Are is very much a story driven by the illustrations. At many points, the pictures say more than the words, such as when Max’s room begins to change into a forest and when the wild things appear. Without these very vivid images,  the book could be perceived in a very different way. Multiple times, images appear without words which reinforces the importance of the illustrations.

Lesson Plans

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

MARTINA THE BEAUTIFUL COCKROACH

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Deedy, C. A. (2007).   Martina the beautiful cockroach.  Atlanta, GA: Peachtree.

Martina Josefina Catalina Cucaracha is a beautiful cockroach, and it is time for her to get married. Her abuela gives her some shocking advice about how to choose the right man: spill coffee on his shoe and see how he reacts. Martina goes through this process with a rooster, pig, lizard, and finally a mouse. The mouse turns the trick on Martina and is able to win her heart thanks to both of their Cuban grandmothers.

Visual Elements of Art:

Color-

Martina the Beautiful Cockroach’s pages display vibrant colors throughout the story that represent the colorful, latin lifestyle in Havana. The scenes are draped in rich colors, radiating the feeling that Havana is a passionate city, full of love.The reds, oranges, and floral patterns automatically give this story a “tropical island” feel. The illustrator’s color choice for Martina also adds a beautiful, vibrant picture of a cute, green cockroach in contrast to the usual stereotype of dark and drab cockroaches, making Martina a more approachable character.

Evaluative Criteria:

Plot-

In Martina the beautiful Cockroach, Martina is searching for a husband, but she is having a hard time finding anyone who can meet her abuela’s strict standards. She goes through many obstacles (potential husbands), but the resolution comes when she finally meets the mouse who also must find someone to live up to his abuela’s standards.

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

OLIVIA

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Falconer, I. (2009). Olivia. NY: Atheneum.

Olivia can do just about anything! She has a little brother, Ian, who drives her crazy, but she still likes him. Olivia is busy all day long and is never very tired. She loves the beach and the museum, and she even tries to do some painting of her own. Even when she gets in a little trouble, her mother reads to her before bed.

Visual Elements of Art:

Color-

Although color doesn’t seem to be a major aspect of Olivia’s illustrations, it is extremely important. The illustrator uses the color red to represent Olivia’s vibrant personality in contrast to the mundane monochromaticity of everyday life. Red can also represent determination as well as passion, desire, and love which are characteristics that the reader definitely associates with Olivia.

Evaluative Criteria:

Character-

Olivia is the perfect example of a defined and developed character in literature. She is strong willed, independent, creative, and also likable; she is a child who might be reading this picture book. When she visits the beach, she must master the sand castle; when she visits the museum, she wants to become a painter, etc. Olivia never stops and is constantly striving for more throughout each day.

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

THE PAPER BAG PRINCESS

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Munsch, R. (2012). The paperbag princess. NY: Annick Press.

Princess Elizabeth loses her castle, prince, and even her clothes to a fire breathing dragon. When she find this dragon, she is able to trick him into using all of his fire and energy. She rescues Prince Ronald, and he responds by telling her that she can come back to him when she is dressed like a princess again. Elizabeth realizes that maybe marrying a prince isn’t the life for her.

Visual Elements of Art:

Texture-

The Paper Bag Princess’s illustrator, Michael Martchenko, uses the contrast of light and dark marks to contrast the idea of the original princess as a comparison to the point in time at which she is the paper bag princess. After she loses her castle and clothes, the princess’s look changes. She is shaded much more heavily and the markings are heavier on the pages. These heavy markings give the illusion of roughness versus smoothness.

Evaluative Criteria:

Theme-

The Paper Bag Princess teaches the reader a valuable lesson without blatantly stating it. The overarching theme is that a girl does not always have to do what a man expects of her, and maybe marrying a prince isn’t every girl’s dream. Being independent and self confident is another key theme readers may gather from the story.

Lesson Plans

http://www.teachyourchildrenwell.com.au/english/bigbooks/Stage%201%20Language%20Unit%20-%20The%20Paper%20Bag%20Princess%20-%20WHOLE%20DOCUMENT.pdf

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

IT’S A BOOK

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Smith, L. (2011). It’s a book. NY: Roaring Brook.

As monkey sits reading a book, jackass bothers him with so many technology questions about the book. Monkey tries to explain over and over again that it is just a fun book to read- no charger, no scrolling, no tweeting, etc. Monkey ends with the poignant line, “It’s a book, jackass.”

Visual Elements of Art:

Shape-

It’s a Book’s illustrator and author, Lane Smith, uses simplistic shapes, mostly squares and rectangles, to not only show the differences but also the similarities between the book that the monkey reads and the electronic device that the jackass uses. The simplicity of Smith’s work allows the reader to build upon his images.

Evaluative Criteria:

Style-

The author of It’s a Book uses repetition, rhyme, and wordplay in this brief but comical story. The repetition of the constant questions by the jackass and the repeated answer of, “It’s a book!” by monkey is seen on almost every other page. Although rhyme is not used heavily, it is subtly seen in the story. Lastly, the comical effect of word play is utilized through the short, snippy conversation between the monkey and jackass and the last comment from monkey, “It’s a Book, Jackass.”

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

Textbook Assignment #1

Textbook Assignment #1- Picture Books

 

Visual Elements of Art:

 

Line My Teacher is a Monster! (No, I Am Not.)

by Peter Brown

In My Teacher is a Monster, lines play an important role in showing Bobby’s changing perspective of his teacher, Ms. Kirby. Bobby throws a paper airplane in class, represented by a dotted line, and is punished for throwing the airplane with no recess which is one occurrence that makes him think she is a monster. His view of her changes when he encounters Ms. Kirby in the park, and she shows him how to make the best paper airplane he has ever seen. Again, the paper airplane is represented by the dotted line now showing his changing opinion of Ms. Kirby possibly no longer being a monster.
Line Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reverso Poems by Marilyn Singer  illustrated by Josee Masse Mirror, Mirror is a book of reverso poems that are each separated by an invisible line. This line between each poem shows the contrast and change of perspective for each poem. In most of the poems, the readers sees the perspective of the protagonist versus the antagonist. One example is Goldilocks and the Three Bears. The separation of these poems solicits the question of whether it was the bears’ fault that they did not lock their door.  
Shape This Is Not My Hat

by Jon Klassen

The author and illustrator of This is Not My Hat uses simple shapes to convey an underwater story. Although the two fish are similar in shape (large ovals), the author uses a change in the size of the shapes to show how the smaller fish compares to the larger. He also uses other simplistic shapes such as circles as bubbles and long lines as algae.
Shape It’s a Bookby Lane Smith It’s a Book’s illustrator and author, Lane Smith, uses simplistic shapes, mostly squares and rectangles, to not only show the differences but also the similarities between the book that the monkey reads and the electronic device that the jackass uses. The simplicity of Smith’s work allows the reader to build upon his images.
Color The Legend of the Bluebonnet

by Tomie dePaola

The Legend of the Bluebonnet shows basic, muted colors for most of story which represents the color scheme that most Comanches were exposed to during the time the story is set. When the bluebonnets finally bloom into beautiful fields of blue, the Comanches finally see hope for their future. The color blue represents this hope.
Color Martina the Beautiful Cockroach

retold by Carmen Agra Deedy  illustrated by Michael Austin

Martina the Beautiful Cockroach’s pages display vibrant colors throughout the story that represent the colorful, latin lifestyle in Havana. The scenes are draped in rich colors, radiating the feeling that Havana is a passionate city, full of love.The reds, oranges, and floral patterns automatically give this story a “tropical island” feel. The illustrator’s color choice for Martina also adds a beautiful, vibrant picture of a cute, green cockroach in contrast to the usual stereotype of dark and drab cockroaches, making Martina a more approachable character.
Color Olivia

by Ian Falconer

Although color doesn’t seem to be a major aspect of Olivia’s illustrations, it is extremely important. The illustrator uses the color red to represent Olivia’s vibrant personality in contrast to the mundane monochromaticity of everyday life. Red can also represent determination as well as passion, desire, and love which are characteristics that the reader definitely associates with Olivia.
Texture Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak Maurice Sendak creates an unusual backdrop to Where The Wild Things Are through the use of visual textures. These illustrations make Max and the Wild Things come to life because of the use of layering. The pages in which Max’s room is changing into a forest are a perfect example of Sendak’s layering that cause the room to come more alive with every page. The images of the wild things are also extremely vivid and extremely specific which help create a very pointed perspective.
Texture The Three Pigs by David Wiesner The Three Pigs author and illustrator, David Wiesner, starts with a traditional cartoonish drawing style but then changes to a more realistic and three-dimensional style. The reader can see the difference in the textures which helps the reader to understand whether the pigs are in the fairytale or the new world of the book’s pages. The reader first sees this contrast on page 3 when the first pig is able to get to safety on the pages of the book. These two concepts continue to be intertwined until the final page of the story in which Wiesner returns to the traditional cartoon stylings.
Texture The Paper Bag Princessby Robert Munschillustrated by Michael Martchenko The Paper Bag Princess’s illustrator, Michael Martchenko, uses the contrast of light and dark marks to contrast the idea of the original princess as a comparison to the point in time at which she is the paper bag princess. After she loses her castle and clothes, the princess’s look changes. She is shaded much more heavily and the markings are heavier on the pages. These heavy markings give the illusion of roughness versus smoothness.
Composition Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reverso Poems

by Marilyn Singer  illustrated by Josee Masse

Mirror, Mirror exhibits all of the characteristics mentioned in previous sections: lines, shapes, color, and texture. There is an invisible line that separates and shows the contrast between the two poems that are displayed on each page. This concept is described in detail above in the line section of this presentation.  Shapes and colors are very important in Mirror, Mirror as the villains are seen with more pointed and angular features and darker clothes while the protagonists are softer and more rounded with light, bright clothing. This concept is seen through the characters of Snow White and the Wicked Queen; Snow White has a kind, round face and is wearing light blue and yellow while the queen has extremely pointed features and is wearing deep red and black. Finally, the visual texture of these poems is enhanced by Josee Masse and his use of both shading and three dimensional images.

 

 

Evaluative Criteria:

 

Character Olivia

by Ian Falconer

Olivia is the perfect example of a defined and developed character in literature. She is strong willed, independent, creative, and also likable; she is a child who might be reading this picture book. When she visits the beach, she must master the sand castle; when she visits the museum, she wants to become a painter, etc. Olivia never stops and is constantly striving for more throughout each day.
Plot Martina the Beautiful Cockroach

retold by Carmen Agra Deedy  illustrated by Michael Austin

In Martina the beautiful Cockroach, Martina is searching for a husband, but she is having a hard time finding anyone who can meet her abuela’s strict standards. She goes through many obstacles (potential husbands), but the resolution comes when she finally meets the mouse who also must find someone to live up to his abuela’s standards.
Setting This Is Not My Hat

by Jon Klassen

The setting of This is Not My Hat is obviously under the sea, as the reader can notice through the illustrations. Although the setting is minimalistic, there is no question as to where the action takes place. The characters also lend themselves to the setting as they are aquatic creatures (i.e. two fish and a crab) swimming around algae and underwater plants.
Theme The Paper Bag Princessby Robert Munschillustrated by Michael Martchenko The Paper Bag Princess teaches the reader a valuable lesson without blatantly stating it. The overarching theme is that a girl does not always have to do what a man expects of her, and maybe marrying a prince isn’t every girl’s dream. Being independent and self confident is another key theme readers may gather from the story.
Theme My Teacher is a Monster! (No, I Am Not.)

by Peter Brown

The subtle meaning in My Teacher is a Monster is about how children, as well as adults, perceive others to be without really knowing them. Specifically in this story, when Bobby sees Ms. Kirby outside of school, he sees her in a new way (not as a monster) compared to the way in which he views her at school. And in turn, Ms. Kirby sees a different side of Bobby when he saves her favorite hat. It is important for readers to see that such preconceived notions go both ways.
Style It’s a Bookby Lane Smith The author of It’s a Book uses repetition, rhyme, and wordplay in this brief but comical story. The repetition of the constant questions by the jackass and the repeated answer of, “It’s a book!” by monkey is seen on almost every other page. Although rhyme is not used heavily, it is subtly seen in the story. Lastly, the comical effect of word play is utilized through the short, snippy conversation between the monkey and jackass and the last comment from monkey, “It’s a Book, Jackass.”
Style Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reverso Poems

by Marilyn Singer  illustrated by Josee Masse

Mirror, Mirror is packed with stylistic elements that enhance the writing of each reverso poem. Singer uses imagery, allusions, and so many more literary devices throughout this collection of poems. The “fragrant green air” in the Jack and the Beanstalk poem and the description of the “moist muzzle” and “hairy ear” in the Beauty and the Beast poem are great examples of imagery. The allusion aspect of the poems is the most obvious element because of the fact that all the poems allude back to fairytale stories known by most people. Mirror, Mirror could be picked apart poem by poem to reveal multiple literary and stylistic elements, but the most important is the author’s use of her reverso poem style.  
Illustrations Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak Where the Wild Things Are is very much a story driven by the illustrations. At many points, the pictures say more than the words, such as when Max’s room begins to change into a forest and when the wild things appear. Without these very vivid images,  the book could be perceived in a very different way. Multiple times, images appear without words which reinforces the importance of the illustrations.
Illustrations The Three Pigs by David Wiesner Illustrations within the story The Three Pigs help the reader to understand the difference between the two world; the fairy tale world and the book’s pages’ world. If only words were on the pages, there would be no way for the reader to infer that the first pig had escaped from the wolf and onto the pages of the book. The illustrations become even more valuable as the pigs fold up the storybook’s pages to travel along. By the end, they have found their way to a happily ever after back in the storybook style pages.
Cultural Markers The Legend of the Bluebonnet

by Tomie dePaola

The Legend of the Bluebonnet is a folktale about how the bluebonnet came to be, so it is a look specifically into the Native American culture. The illustrations as well as words give the reader a glimpse into Comanche life. She-who-is-alone sacrifices her prized possession, her warrior doll, to The Great Spirits in order to save her people from drought. Just reading that sentence, the reader can see the Native American name and the idea of the supernatural Great Spirits. This folktale not only explains how a flower came to be in Texas, but it also allows the reader some insight into a different culture.

 

Posted in Books for Assignment #1

MY TEACHER IS A MONSTER!

download

Brown, P. (2014). My teacher is a monster. NY: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Robert thinks that his teacher, Ms. Kirby, is a monster because of her harsh behavior at school. That is until one day when he has a chance encounter with her in the park, and he saves her favorite hat. They then go to Robert’s favorite spot in the park where Ms. Kirby helps him fly a paper airplane. His perspective changes, but will it continue to be changed after he returns to school?

Visual Elements of Art:

Line-

In My Teacher is a Monster, lines play an important role in showing Bobby’s changing perspective of his teacher, Ms. Kirby. Bobby throws a paper airplane in class, represented by a dotted line, and is punished for throwing the airplane with no recess which is one occurrence that makes him think she is a monster. His view of her changes when he encounters Ms. Kirby in the park, and she shows him how to make the best paper airplane he has ever seen. Again, the paper airplane is represented by the dotted line now showing his changing opinion of Ms. Kirby possibly no longer being a monster.

Evaluative Criteria:

Theme-

The subtle meaning in My Teacher is a Monster is about how children, as well as adults, perceive others to be without really knowing them. Specifically in this story, when Bobby sees Ms. Kirby outside of school, he sees her in a new way (not as a monster) compared to the way in which he views her at school. And in turn, Ms. Kirby sees a different side of Bobby when he saves her favorite hat. It is important for readers to see that such preconceived notions go both ways.