Posted in Books for Assignment #4

GOOD MASTERS! SWEET LADIES!

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Schlitz, L. A. (2007).   Good masters! sweet ladies! Boston, MA:  Candlewick Press.

Schlitz helps the reader take a step back into an English village in 1255, where memorable characters tell their stories. Instead of the typical narrative structure, the book is styled as a series of poetic monologues and two dialogues. The words are spoken from the perspective of young medieval villagers from all walks of life. Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! is an inventive, historical fiction book that gives young readers a glimpse into Medieval England.

Textbook Assignment-Book Review:

In Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!, Schlittz helps the reader take a step back into an English village in 1255, where twenty-two memorable characters tell their stories. Instead of the typical narrative structure, the book is styled as a series of poetic monologues and two dialogues. The words are spoken from the perspective of young medieval villagers from all walks of life. It is interesting to see a portrayal of the Middle Ages lacking the common viewpoint of the lavish lives of lords and ladies. The accuracy from the side notes and descriptions of the towns as well as the villages give the reader a portrayal of the dirt and filth in which most medieval people lived. We see many of the negative aspects of lives no matter their station. Isobel might be the Lord’s daughter, but that doesn’t save her from the disgusting dung that is thrown at her; Alice is a poor shepherdess, but she learns about life, tenderness, and care through her love of her sheep, Jill.  Although starvation, lice, death, disease, and hypocrisy are all noted, the lighter side of life can also be seen within some of these impoverished characters.

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Book Lover. Dog-Mom. Traveler. Teacher. Wife. Wannabe Chef. Librarian.

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